2019 Designated as the "Year of Carbon"

The Geological Society of London has designated 2019 as the “Year of Carbon.” Throughout the year, the Society will explore the geoscience of carbon through research conferences, public lectures, educational programs, and other activities. 

2019 Year of Carbon

The Geological Society of London (GSL) has designated 2019 as the “Year of Carbon.” Throughout the year, the Society will explore the geoscience of carbon through research conferences, public lectures, educational programs, and other activities. 

“2019 is the perfect year to celebrate carbon,” says Marie Edmonds (University of Cambridge, UK), chair of DCO’s Synthesis Group 2019, who also serves as the Geological Society’s Secretary for Science. “It’s a perfect synergistic match between GSL’s goal to share knowledge and DCO’s mission to synthesize what has been learned about deep carbon over the past decade.”
    
A number of planned activities focus on deep carbon. Highlights are listed below with a complete list available here

Conferences

VMSG 2019, the Annual Meeting of the Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group 
8-10 January 2019
University of St Andrews, UK

The Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group (VMSG) is a joint special interest group of the Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland and the Geological Society of London. VMSG is the main hub for the UK community of igneous, volcanic and magmatic scientists. 

Bryan Lovell Meeting 2019Role of geological science in the decarbonisation of power production, heat, transport and industry
Convenors: Mike Stephenson and Dave Schofield, British Geological Survey, UK, 
Sebastian Gieger, Heriot-Watt University, UK, and Phil Ringrose, Equinor/NTNU, Norway
21–23 January 2019
Geological Society of London, Burlington House

Decarbonisation is central to Government and international policy and this three day conference will host national experts from industry, academia, and government to look at the geological and reservoir engineering aspects of the problem. The main objective will be to identify the high level barriers to progress and the main science questions — and begin a roadmap to solve the problems.

Janet Watson Meeting 
Conveners: Simon Matthews, University of Cambridge, UK, and Lotta Purkamo, University of St Andrews, UK
26–28 February 2019
Geological Society of London, Burlington House

This three-day meeting will bring together early career geoscientists and senior members of the Deep Carbon research community. Presentations and discussions will encompass the latest advances in our understanding of the behavior of carbon at the extreme pressures and temperatures of the Earth’s deep interior, the exchange of carbon between the near-surface and deep reservoirs, the abiotic development of organic compounds through deep time, and the extreme limits of life on Earth. Mentoring activities will take place throughout the meeting, where senior scientists will lead small group discussions about their research careers and experiences in academia.

Lyell Meeting 2019: Carbon: geochemical and palaeobiological perspectives
28 June 2019
Geological Society of London, Burlington House

The 2019 Lyell Meeting will bring together a broad spectrum of scientists to address the big picture of carbon in Earth’s system, drawing on expertise in palaeontology, geochemistry, palaeobotany, atmospheric processes, deep-Earth processes, and anthropogenic impacts. This meeting seeks to foster conversation between these disparate communities to facilitate a more holistic approach to considering carbon, and how it cycles between Earth’s organic and inorganic reservoirs.

Public Lectures

The story of Earth: How life, rocks, and the carbon cycle have co-evolved
Robert Hazen, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington DC, USA
Wednesday 27 February 2019
18:00–19:00, Geological Society of London, Burlington House 

The story of Earth is a 4.5-billion-year saga of dramatic transformations, driven by physical, chemical, and—based on a fascinating growing body of evidence—biological processes. The co-evolution of life and rocks, the emerging paradigm that frames this lecture, unfolds in an irreversible sequence of evolutionary stages. Each stage re-sculpted our planet’s surface, while introducing new planetary processes and phenomena. The cycling of carbon played central roles as each stage inexorably paved the way for the next. This grand and intertwined tale of Earth’s living and non-living spheres is only now coming into focus.

Diamond windows into the deep Earth 
Kate Kiseeva, University College Cork, Ireland; University of Oxford, UK
27 March 2019
18:00–19:00, Geological Society of London, Burlington House 

Diamonds, thought to form in the upper mantle and the mantle transition zone (410–660 km) often incorporate small pieces of surrounding material when they form. These inclusions provide a unique window into the deep mantle, giving researchers much-needed information about the composition of our planet as well as processes which took places millions and billions of years ago. Dr. Kiseeva will give an overview of deep diamonds and their inclusions: how these diamonds form, what minerals they bring, what they tell us about the composition of the deep mantle, and how they relate to the deep carbon cycle.

Volcanoes and past climate: adventures with deep carbon (event link)
Tamsin Mather, University of Oxford, UK
14 November 2019
18:00–19:00, Geological Society of London, Burlington House 

In this talk, volcanologist Professor Tamsin Mather will explore some of the different types of volcanic activity that we see on Earth today and have seen over its geological history. She will reveal how studying volcanic gases and rocks today can give us fundamental insights on some of the drivers of long-term global climate evolution and some of the most profound environmental changes in geological history including mass extinction events.

Special Issue

Journal of the Geological Society 
Thematic set: Carbon forms: paths and processes in the Earth
View available articles here.

 

Rutherfordine
A closeup of the crystals in the carbon-bearing mineral rutherfordine. View a gallery of carbon-bearing minerals hereImage courtesy Rruff Database.

 

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