EarthCube Early Career Strategic Visioning Workshop

 

The EarthCube Early Career Strategic Visioning Workshop gathered 68 early career geoscientists, computer scientists, and others at the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington on 16-17 October 2012. The purpose of the workshop, which was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), was to develop a shared vision for success of the cyberinfrastructure necessary to support the next generation of geoscience research. The workshop was invited to the Carnegie campus by the Deep Carbon Observatory, which recently launched a data science initiative that will spearhead fundamental changes in the conduct geoscience research.

The workshop participants engaged in the highly interactive process of mapping their own career aspirations and considering how a robust cyberinfrastructure might enable them to tackle high-impact research questions and deliver education in new ways. Most participants were assistant professors, but post docs, doctoral students, and a few others also attended. The workshop invitees were selected based on their potential as emerging leaders in their respective fields. 

The workshop was part of the NSF's EarthCube initiative.  EarthCube is a ten-year effort designed to create a knowledge management system and infrastructure that integrates all geosciences data in an open, transparent and inclusive manner. The overarching motivation for the workshop was to develop an understanding of how the research and educational trajectories of future leaders in the geosciences, computer sciences, and other relevant fields map align with the future direction and potential for EarthCube.  Four major workshop goals were to:

1) Map EarthCube onto career trajectories,

2) Contribute to EarthCube vision,

3) Inform EarthCube governance, and

  4) Enable networking and professional development.

 

The overarching motivation for the workshop was to develop an understanding of how the research and educational trajectories of future leaders in the geosciences, computer sciences, and other relevant fields map align with the future direction and potential for EarthCube.

 

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