Deep Carbon 2019

Overview

Deep Carbon 2019: Launching the Next Decade of Deep Carbon Science is an international science conference sponsored by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Carnegie Institution for Science, and other organizations. Deep Carbon 2019 will take place 24-26 October, 2019 in Washington, DC. The conference will highlight DCO’s many scientific advances, representing the culmination of ten years of deep carbon research, exploration, and discovery. Deep Carbon 2019 will also serve to launch the future endeavors of this dynamic, interdisciplinary community.

Over the course of three days, we will share DCO’s key successes and showcase novel and forward-looking achievements in science, modeling, and instrumentation through presentations, panel discussions, posters, exhibits, books, films, and more. Marcia McNutt, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, will host Deep Carbon 2019 at the historic headquarters of the National Academy of Sciences on Constitution Avenue.

The meeting will explore the significant progress and remaining questions in a variety of deep carbon science topics, such as:

  • the nature and extent of carbon in Earth’s core and the effects of extreme temperatures and pressures on carbon’s interactions with other elements 
  • the physical and thermodynamic pathways in the crust and mantle that control the movements of organic molecules and how organic molecules such as methane form in deep Earth
  • the nature of the whole Earth carbon cycle and how has it changed over Earth’s history
  • the mechanisms that govern microbial evolution and dispersal in the deep biosphere and the ecological principles that explain deep microbial community structure

Program

The conference program will be emailed to participants and posted here in late September.
 


Transportation

There are two main airports servicing Washington, DC: Reagan National Airport (DCA) and Dulles International Airport (IAD). Reagan National Airport (DCA) is the most convenient choice with direct accessibility to the subway (Metro) and close proximity to downtown. Dulles International Airport is located farther from downtown (~45-minute taxi ride), but often offers more affordable fares, especially international flights.

Ground transportation options in Washington include the Metro, Uber / Lyft and taxi. Please note that we will provide shuttle bus transportation between the plenary and poster sessions as well as to the reception Friday evening.


Venues

Plenary sessions: 
National Academy of Sciences 2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418

Poster sessions:
Carnegie Institution for Science 1530 P St NW, Washington, DC 20005

Reception:
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History 10th St & Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20560

Story Collider: 
Busboys and Poets 2021 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

street map of washington, DC with marked venue locations

Open this map in Google Maps.
 


Draft Schedule

Thursday, 24 October 2019

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM - Registration

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM - Plenary Sessions

4:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Poster Session

8:00 PM - Story Collider
 

Friday, 25 October 2019

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM - Plenary Sessions

4:30 PM - 7:00 PM - Poster Session

7:30 PM - Reception
 

Saturday, 26 October 2019

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM - Plenary Sessions


Sunday, 27 October 2019

Satellite meetings of opportunity
 

Please note that we will provide shuttle transportation from the Plenary Sessions at NAS to the Poster Sessions at Carnegie on Thursday and Friday. We'll also provide shuttles from the Friday Poster Session to the Reception.
 


Accommodations

Participants are responsible for arranging their own travel and hotel reservations. We strongly advise you to make your hotel reservations as soon as possible. Our meeting dates overlap with other city-wide events and as our meeting dates approach, we anticipate that many hotels will be sold out and/or their rates may rise above the per diem reimbursement limit. 

Below are several hotels within a 1-2 miles from the conference venues, but there are dozens of other options in the greater DC area.

AirBNB is another recommended option, especially for participants who might want to share common space. Please contact us if you need specific questions regarding accommodations. 

 

Near National Academy of Sciences:

The Courtyard by Marriott Washington DC / Foggy Bottom 515 20th St NW, Washington, DC 20006

Hotel Hive 2224 F St NW, Washington, DC 20037

River Inn 924 25th St NW, Washington, DC 20037

 

Near Dupont Circle / Carnegie Science:

Tabard Inn 1739 N St NW, Washington, DC 20036

The Fairfax at Embassy Row 2100 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008

Kimpton Hotel Palomar 2121 P St NW, Washington, DC 20037

Holiday Inn Washington DC - Central 1501 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005
 

Other hotels downtown:

The Westin DC City Center 1400 M St NW, Washington, DC 20005
 


Contact

Please direct questions to DeepCarbon2019@carnegiescience.edu
 


Deep Carbon 2019 Sponsors

Sloan Foundation logo      Carnegie Science logo     Shell Pecten 

 GIA logo     logo for Mineralogical Society

DC2019 Science Program Committee

  • Isabelle Daniel
    Isabelle Daniel Université Claude Bernard Lyon, France
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    Isabelle Daniel
    Isabelle Daniel
    Université Claude Bernard Lyon, France

    Prof. Isabelle Daniel’s research interests focus on geobiology and minerals/rocks under extreme conditions. In her work, she employs advanced in situ experimental and analytical methods such as Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. She investigates serpentinization and serpentine minerals, fluid-rock interactions at high pressure and microorganisms under extreme conditions. Daniel is a faculty member in Earth Sciences at the Université Claude Bernard Lyon1 in France, where she is also affiliated with the Laboratoire de Geologie de Lyon and chairs the Observatoire de Lyon. Because of the depth and breadth of her research, Daniel serves as chair of the Scientific Steering Committee for the Deep Energy Community and as a member of the Scientific Steering Committee for the Deep Life Community. She is also active in the DCO’s Extreme Physics and Chemistry Community.

  • Dr. James Badro
    James Badro Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France
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    Dr. James Badro
    James Badro
    Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France

    Dr. James Badro, research director at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and scientific collaborator at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, is expanding what is known about Deep Earth geophysics and geochemistry through high pressure experiments and first principles calculations. His research interests combine experimental petrology, geochemistry, and experimental and computational mineral physics to understand mantle and core composition, structure and dynamics, and Earth’s formation and evolution. Professor Badro is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a life fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America.

  • Peter Barry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    Peter Barry Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
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    Peter Barry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    Peter Barry
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • Dr. Mark Lever
    Mark Lever ETH Zurich, Switzerland
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    Dr. Mark Lever
    Mark Lever
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland

    Dr. Mark Lever is a professor of environmental microbiology in the Department of Environmental Systems Science in the Institute of Biogeochemical and Pollutant Dynamics at ETH Zurich. His research interests include geomicrobiology, microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem ecology of aquatic sediments and Earth's crust with a focus on the carbon cycle. In addition to teaching and research, Lever serves as an associate editor for Frontiers in Extreme Microbiology, and as a review editor. He is a member of the Deep Life Community and serves on Synthesis Group 2019. 

  • Catherine McCammon
    Catherine McCammon Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Germany
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    Catherine McCammon
    Catherine McCammon
    Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, Germany

    Catherine McCammon is a senior scientist at Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth. Her research interests extend over the physics and chemistry of minerals and their influence on Earth properties and processes, but she is probably best known for her enthusiasm as a Mössbauer spectroscopist.

  • Brendan McCormick Kilbride
    Brendan McCormick Kilbride University of Manchester, UK
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    Brendan McCormick Kilbride
    Brendan McCormick Kilbride
    University of Manchester, UK

    The majority of Brendan’s research has involved the use of satellite remote sensing to study longterm trends in volcanic sulfur dioxide gas emissions, from individual volcanoes and on the regional/global scale. After completing his doctorate at the University of Cambridge (with particular attention to emissions from volcanoes in Papua New Guinea and Ecuador, and the use of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument), Brendan spent two years as a postdoctoral researcher at the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, co-funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory. He has undertaken work to reconcile satellite observations of syn-eruptive gas emissions and geodesy as part of the NERC-funded Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics. Brendan is currently working on data and samples acquired during a month-long field campaign in September to several volcanoes and geothermal fields in Papua New Guinea.

  • Dr. Graham Pearson
    Graham Pearson University of Alberta, Canada
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    Dr. Graham Pearson
    Graham Pearson
    University of Alberta, Canada

    Dr. Graham Pearson is a mantle geochemist whose research interests focus on the origin and evolution of the continental lithospheric mantle and its diamond cargo. His current region of interest is Arctic Canada and its diamond-bearing roots. Pearson is a professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at the University of Alberta. In hopes of sharing diamond knowledge,he helped organize DCO’s third International Diamond School and is an active member of the Reservoir and Fluxes’ Diamonds and Mantle Geodynamics of Carbon Consortium.

  • Dr. Craig Schiffries
    Craig Schiffries Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution for Science, USA
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    Dr. Craig Schiffries
    Craig Schiffries
    Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution for Science, USA

    Dr. Craig Schiffries is director of the Deep Carbon Observatory and a research scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science. As a member of the DCO Secretariat and Executive Committee, he helps coordinate all components of DCO. Much of his career spans the interface between science and public policy, advising government agencies and strengthening scientific institutions. He served as a Congressional Science Fellow, director of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the U.S. National Academies, and the first director for geoscience policy at the Geological Society of America. In addition to his technical publications in geochemistry, petrology, and economic geology, he has written on science policy and testified before the U.S. Congress, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and other advisory bodies. He also serves as a member of Synthesis Group 2019.

  • Dr. Fengping Wang
    Fengping Wang Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
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    Dr. Fengping Wang
    Fengping Wang
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

    Dr. Fengping Wang is a professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Wang’s work focuses on the subsurface biosphere, specifically microbial diversity and geochemical processes, environmental adaptation mechanisms of extremophiles, and metabolic processes and pathways of extremophiles. She was awarded the Outstanding Young Scientist grant from the Natural Science Foundation of China for Deep Biosphere research. She also serves as a scientific committee member of IODP-China since 2014.

Top image credit: Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington

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