DCO Modeling and Visualization Proposal Funded

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation recently approved funding of a novel modeling and visualization program for the Deep Carbon Observatory.

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation recently approved funding of a novel modeling and visualization program for the Deep Carbon Observatory. The project, led by Elizabeth Cottrell (Smithsonian Institution, USA) forms a crucial part of DCO’s ambition to create new and comprehensive views of Earth.

Over the course of the next two years, Cottrell proposes a series of activities to bring together experts in deep carbon science, dynamic modeling, and data visualization. The aim is to generate a road map for the DCO community as it progresses toward creation of a 4D planetary carbon circulation model. Creating such a model is necessarily highly interdisciplinary, and will unite geobiologists, geochemists, and geodynamicists, as well as data scientists and engineers in their effort to develop an innovative platform for visualizing Earth’s full carbon cycle.

This project will also begin the process of synthesizing the multi-disciplinary work of DCO. With 2019 marking the end of a decade of discovery for DCO scientists, a comprehensive, 4D platform for data visualization represents a key legacy of DCO.   

 

 

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