DCO in Wikipedia

Wikipedia, the free crowd-sourced online encyclopedia, is one of the top ten websites in the world in terms of monthly traffic to the site [1]. Over five million Wikipedia articles cover a vast range of topics, dozens of which relate to topics of interest to DCO, from bioreactor to kimberlite to x-ray diffraction.

Wikipedia, the free crowd-sourced online encyclopedia, is one of the top ten websites in the world in terms of monthly traffic to the site [1]. Over five million Wikipedia articles cover a vast range of topics, dozens of which relate to topics of interest to DCO, from bioreactor to kimberlite to x-ray diffraction.

For DCO, Wikipedia offers an opportunity to present deep carbon science to a broader audience. DCO research will develop new knowledge, as well as refine and expand our understanding of existing topics. Presenting the advances in deep carbon science to an audience numbering in the millions will be an important part of DCO’s legacy.

For all of these reasons, the Engagement Team is spearheading the effort to include DCO science in relevant Wikipedia entries. To this end, we are soliciting recommendations for article topics. In some cases, DCO researchers will be able to improve or expand upon existing articles by providing expert review. In other cases, DCO researchers may want to provide entirely new content. The Engagement Team will facilitate this process by updating the articles with DCO scientists’ edits. While we encourage everyone in the DCO Science Network to review and edit Wikipedia content directly, we are available to assist, answer questions, or make the edits on your behalf.

To get you started, we’ve compiled a list of fifty common terms used in DCO publications, based upon the most common subject areas in papers listed in the DCO Publications Browser. The terms are linked to the corresponding Wikipedia pages on this page. This list is provided only as a starting point. There are doubtless many other terms used in DCO that could be added, and we encourage you to share them with us.

Wikipedia is egalitarian; anyone is permitted to edit any article (editors are termed “Wikipedians”). The style of writing is more informal than a journal article, but still precise. Wikipedia’s goal is “to make each part of every article as understandable as possible to the widest audience of readers who are likely to be interested in that material.”[2] 

All content must be verifiable in reliable sources, ideally with citations to those sources. It is important to note that while there may be dozens of entries of interest and relevance to DCO, there are no pages that DCO “owns.” No one owns any Wikipedia page; any page may be edited by anyone.[3]  Over 130,000 people regularly edit Wikipedia pages [4]. So feel free to recommend edits to pages or even edit them yourself. It could be a single sentence, several paragraphs, or an entirely new entry for a term that has not been documented in Wikipedia yet. It’s important to know Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia, not a vehicle for advocacy, promotion, or public relations [5]. Wikipedia stresses a “just the facts” approach to content.

If you have questions, comments or suggestions about incorporating the results of DCO research in Wikipedia please contact josh_wood@uri.edu (Josh Wood) of the Engagement Team.

Further Reading

DCO Highlights Contribute to Deep Carbon Science on Wikipedia for a Chance to Win $500

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DCO Highlights Cite for Sore Eyes: Filling the Deep Carbon Science Blanks on Wikipedia

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