Oman Drilling Project Completes Phase 1 Core Logging on D/V Chikyu

Sixty-seven scientists from the Oman Drilling Project, including six Omani trainees, logged 1500 m of core while onboard scientific Drilling Vessel Chikyu over the last two months.

On 15 September 2017, scientific Drilling Vessel Chikyu arrived at Hachinohe Port, Japan and members of the Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) core logging team disembarked with cases of precious samples. The shipboard Science Party of 67, including six Omani trainees, logged 1500 m of core while onboard over the last two months. This was the first time that hard rock cores were analyzed using the Chikyu labs. Most of the core logging took place while Chikyu was in port in Shimizu, near Tokyo, however the team ended their time onboard with a two-week transit to Hachinohe, in northern Honshu.

“It really is fantastic to log lower crust and mantle rocks using these state of the art facilities on Chikyu, whose mission is to drill to the mantle!” said OmanDP PI Damon Teagle.

“I am not exaggerating when I say that this successful effort was one of the most rewarding in my research career,” said OmanDP Chief Scientist Peter Kelemen.

The Science Party will publish their results as an Initial Report Volume of OmanDP Phase 1, along with wireline logging data from all six sites drilled in Phase 1. The team is also hosting a late-breaking session at the 2017 AGU Fall Meeting in New Orleans to share initial results.

OmanDP Phase 2 drilling operations are tentatively scheduled to begin on 1 November 2017 with coring at sites CM1 and CM2 (crust-mantle transition). Drilling at these first two sites is estimated to last approximately eight weeks. Drilling at BA1 site (active serpentinization) will likely begin in late December/early January and should be completed by March 2018. The online application form is now open for those interested in participating in Phase 2 drill site operations. The deadline for applications is Friday 13 October 2017. Please visit the OmanDP website for more information.

 

Barbara Zihlmann (University of Southampton) and Dominik Mock (University of Hannover) logging alteration in the gabbro cores of GT1A.

 

Members of the Oman Drilling Project Committee visited Chikyu on 10 August 2017. 

 

Personal sample requests marked on the working half cores from GT2A.

 

Catriona Menzies (University of Southampton) and Jude Coggon (OmanDP Project Manager) curating the personal sampling process.

 

Keishi Okazaki (JAMSTEC) & Masaru Yasunaga (Chikyu Curator) contemplating some of the many personal samples.

 

The Leg 1 team before crossover with incoming Leg 2 team.

 

Leg 1 igneous team handing over information about core flow, data acquisition, sample measurements, etc. to leg 2 igneous team. (L-R: Tomoaki Morishita; Juergen Koepke; Kevin Johnson; Ana Jesus; Romain Lafay; Kathi Faak) 

 

Leg 1 alteration team handing over information about core flow, data acquisition, sample measurements, etc. to leg 2 alteration team. (L-R: Dominik Mock; Michelle Harris: Craig Manning; Juan-Carlos de Obeso; Dave Zeko; Tetsu Akitou) 

 

Leg 2 scientists onboard Chikyu as they finally arrive into port. 9 weeks, 1500m of amazing core and 67 amazing scientists!

All photos courtesy of the Oman Drilling Project. Follow the team's progress on Twitter and Facebook

 

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