Oman Drilling Project Continues with Core Logging on Scientific Drilling Vessel Chikyu

The core logging will continue through 15 September 2017. This is the first time D/V Chikyu core logging facilities have been used to process hardrock drilling samples.


Phase one of the Oman Drilling Project has moved to Japan, to the drilling vessel Chikyu, where detailed analysis of cores is underway. The shipboard Science Party of 67, including six Omani trainees, is performing detailed, IODP-standard logging of 1500m of core. The core logging, which began earlier this month, will continue through 15 September 2017. This is the first time D/V Chikyu core logging facilities have been used to process hardrock drilling samples.


The Science Party is divided into six groups. The Igneous, Alteration, and Structural teams are working primarily on visual core description and description of thin sections. The Paleomagnetics, Physical Properties, and Geochemistry teams are simultaneously applying specialist analytical techniques to the cores and core samples.

The Science Party will publish their results as an Initial Report Volume of OmanDP Phase 1, along with wireline logging data from all six sites drilled in Phase 1.

OmanDP Phase 2 drilling operations are tentatively scheduled to begin on 1 November 2017 with coring at site MD1 (crust-mantle transition). Drilling at this first site is estimated to last approximately five to six weeks. Drilling at BA site (active serpentinization) will likely begin in mid-late December/early January and should be completed by March 2018. The online application form is now closed, but will reopen on 10 September 2017 for further applications to participate in Phase 2. The deadline for applications to participate in Phase 2 drill site science operations is Friday 13 October 2017. Please visit the OmanDP website for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All photos courtesy of the Oman Drilling Project. Follow the team's progress on Twitter and Facebook

 

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