Video: Private Lives of Minerals, a public lecture by Robert Hazen

In this public lecture, delivered on 15 November 2016 at the Carnegie Institution for Science, USA, DCO's Executive Director Robert Hazen talks about insights gained from his work in "Big-Data Mineralogy."

The distribution of minerals on Earth, Mars, and other worlds mimics social networks, as commonly applied to such varied topics as Facebook interactions, the spread of disease, and terrorism networks. Applying network analysis to common rocks, such as granite and basalt, reveals patterns of cohesion, segregation, density, and cliques that are similar to those of human social networks. These patterns provide new insights into the way planets evolve, especially the co-evolving geosphere and biosphere. Network analysis also offers promising new pedagogical approaches to teaching mineralogy and petrology.

- source: Carnegie Institution for Science Geophysical Laboratory 

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