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Patches Along Core-Mantle Boundary May Be Deep Hiding Place for Oxygen

Patches Along Core-Mantle Boundary May Be Deep Hiding Place for Oxygen

Almost 3,000 kilometers below the surface, mysterious patches sit in between the rocky mantle and Earth’s iron-rich core. Scientists know of these blotches because they significantly slow passing seismic waves generated by earthquakes. Since the discovery of these so-called “ultralow-velocity zones” (ULVZs) in the mid-1990s, researchers have proposed several possible explanations, but no one has been able to fully account for these subsurface anomalies.

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Two Groups Solve the Structure of Polymeric Carbon Dioxide 15 February 2012 Feature

Under conditions of high pressure and temperature (about 35 GPa at 1500 K), carbon dioxide (CO2)…

Crystalline Material Composed of Amorphous Carbon 15 February 2012 Feature

Solid-state materials can be categorized by their structure into three phases: crystalline (having…

Magnesite as a Deep Carbon Reservoir 15 February 2011 Feature

Mantle rocks show evidence of minerals made of carbon with different oxidation states  -- minerals…

Stability of Polymeric Carbon Dioxide in the Earth's Mantle 15 February 2011 Feature

Recent experiments reveal that a polymeric form of CO2 is stable at the pressure-temperature…

Compressing Methane with Moissanite 15 February 2011 Feature

The behavior of methane—the most abundant organic molecule in the cosmos and a critical energy…

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