PROJECT

Frontiers Research Topic

Research Topic on Deep Carbon, June 2019

This Research Topic on Deep Carbon gathers the advances in our understanding of the slow, deep carbon cycle that, among other factors, controls the habitability of planet Earth over geological time scales. The papers explore different facets of this unifying concept, including the forms of carbon in the deep Earth, whether at shallow or at great depth (methane, abiotic hydrocarbons, carbon mineralogy and petrology, diamonds).

This collection also considers the origins of carbon, whether biotic or abiotic, and includes the origin of terrestrial carbon. Topical questions considered include: How was it delivered and processed on early Earth? How could this relate to the origin of life? Contributing authors will investigate the role of carbon emission by addressing carbon transfers in all geological/tectonics settings – oceanic ridges, seafloor, rifts, arc volcanoes, and others.

Forty-nine scientists contributed to this collection. 

How to cite this special issue: 

Daniel I, Zahirovic S, Bower DJ, Cardace D, Ionescu A, Mikhail S, Pistone M, eds. (2019) Research Topic on Deep Carbon. Special issue, Frontiers

Table of Contents

Click on the titles below to access the papers.

Stability of Organic Carbon Components in Shale: Implications for Carbon Cycle Basu S, Verchovsky AB, Bogush A, Jones AP, Jourdan A-L
On the Role of the Urey Reaction in Extracting Carbon From the Earth's Atmosphere and Adding It to the Continental Crust Kellogg LH, Turcotte DL, Lokavarapu H
Wetting behavior of iron-carbon melt in silicates at mid-mantle pressures with implications for Earth's deep carbon cycle Dong J, Li J, Zhu F
Understanding degassing pathways along the 1886 Tarawera (New Zealand) volcanic fissure by combining soil and lake CO2 fluxes

Hughes EC, Mazot A, Kilgour G, Asher C, Michelini M, Britten K, Chardot L, Feisel Y, Werner C

Deep carbon cycling over the past 200 million years: a review of fluxes in different tectonic settings Wong K, Mason E, Brune S, East M, Edmonds M, Zahirovic S
Exploring the Deep Marine Biosphere: Challenges, Innovations, and Opportunities Cario A, Oliver GC, Rogers KL
Ecology of Subseafloor Crustal Biofilms Ramírez GA, Garber AI, Lecoeuvre A, D’Angelo T, Wheat CG, Orcutt BN
Establishment of the Deep Mine Microbial Observatory (DeMMO), South Dakota, USA, a Geochemically Stable Portal Into the Deep Subsurface Osburn MR, Kruger B, Masterson AL, Casar CP, Amend JP
Origin of Short-Chain Organic Acids in Serpentinite Mud Volcanoes of the Mariana Convergent Margin Eickenbusch P, Takai K, Sissman O, Suzuki S, Menzies C, Sakai S, Sansjofre P, Tasumi E, Bernasconi SM, Glombitza C, Barker Jørgensen B, Morono Y, Lever MA

Corrigendum: Polymerized 4-Fold Coordinated Carbonate Melts in the Deep Mantle

Sanloup C, Hudspeth JM, Afonina V, Cochain B, Konôpková Z, Lelong G, Cormier L, Cavallari C
Hydrostatic pressure helps to cultivate an original anaerobic bacterium from the Atlantis Massif subseafloor (IODP Expedition 357): Petrocella atlantisensis gen. nov. sp. nov. Quéméneur M, Erauso G, Frouin E, Zeghal E, Vandecasteele C, Ollivier B, Tamburini C, Garel M, Menez B, Postec A

An Improved Method for Extracting Viruses From Sediment: Detection of Far More Viruses in the Subseafloor Than Previously Reported

Pan D, Morono Y, Inagaki F, Takai K

Polymerized 4-Fold Coordinated Carbonate Melts in the Deep Mantle

Sanloup C, Hudspeth JM, Afonina V, Cochain B, Konôpková Z, Lelong G, Cormier L, Cavallari C

About the Editors

  • Isabelle Daniel
    Isabelle Daniel Université Claude Bernard Lyon, France
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    Isabelle Daniel
    Isabelle Daniel
    Université Claude Bernard Lyon, France

    Prof. Isabelle Daniel’s research interests focus on geobiology and minerals/rocks under extreme conditions. In her work, she employs advanced in situ experimental and analytical methods such as Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. She investigates serpentinization and serpentine minerals, fluid-rock interactions at high pressure and microorganisms under extreme conditions. Daniel is a faculty member in Earth Sciences at the Université Claude Bernard Lyon1 in France, where she is also affiliated with the Laboratoire de Geologie de Lyon and chairs the Observatoire de Lyon. Because of the depth and breadth of her research, Daniel serves as chair of the Scientific Steering Committee for the Deep Energy Community and as a member of the Scientific Steering Committee for the Deep Life Community. She is also active in the DCO’s Extreme Physics and Chemistry Community.

  • Dan J Bower
    Dan J Bower University of Bern, Switzerland
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    Dan J Bower
    Dan J Bower
    University of Bern, Switzerland

    Dr. Bower is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bern. His research focuses on understanding the thermochemical evolution of Earth and other rocky planets using numerical and analytical models that incorporate insights from complementary disciplines such as astrophysics, mineral physics, geochemistry, and seismology. He received his doctorate in geophysics from the California Institute of Technology.

  • Artur Ionescu
    Artur Ionescu Babeș-Bolyai University Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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    Artur Ionescu
    Artur Ionescu
    Babeș-Bolyai University Cluj-Napoca, Romania

    Dr. Ionescu is a postdoctoral researcher at Babeș-Bolyai University, and a faculty in Environmental Science and Engineering. His research interest is the gas geochemistry of methane in different geological manifestations.

  • Université de Lausanne,, Switzerland
    Mattia Pistone Mattia Pistone
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    Université de Lausanne,, Switzerland
    Mattia Pistone
    Mattia Pistone

    Dr. Pistone is a senior lecturer at the Université de Lausanne. He is a lab and field geologist, petrologist, volcanologist, and rock physicist with 10-year research experience and 19 publications in international peer-reviewed journals. He is an enthusiastic communicator, team player, and project manager with strong track record in international collaborative partnerships, and a pro-active prompt problem solver with creative approach transcending traditional disciplinary boundaries. Pistone is a member of the American Geophysical Union, European Geophysical Union, Geological Society of America, Geological Society of London, and the American Mineralogical Association. He is a recipient of the European Geophysical Union’s Outstanding Young Scientist Award of its Earth Magnetism and Rock Physics Division.

  • Sabin Zahirovic
    Sabin Zahirovic Sabin Zahirovic
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    Sabin Zahirovic
    Sabin Zahirovic
    Sabin Zahirovic

    Dr. Zahirovic is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Sydney. His research has focused on global and regional plate tectonic reconstructions, paleogeography, geodynamics, with more recent work on the links between plate tectonics and the planetary deep carbon cycle. He led a DCO modeling workshop in 2017 and plans another in Australia in July 2019. Zahirovic is a member of the American Geophysical Union, European Geophysical Union, and the Geological Society of Australia, where he also serves as the seminar organizer. His contributions to DCO were recognized as a recipient of the DCO’s Emerging Leader Award in 2018.

  • Dawn Cardace
    Dawn Cardace University of Rhode Island, United States
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    Dawn Cardace
    Dawn Cardace
    University of Rhode Island, United States

    Dr. Cardace is an Assistant Professor of Geosciences at the University of Rhode Island. Her research focuses on the geobiology of tectonic margins, with particular interest in stimulated biogeochemical cycling and biomineralization at these tectonic edges. She was a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow and is a member of NASA’s Rock Powered Life NAI CAN7 Team.

  • Sami Mikhail
    Sami Mikhail University of St Andrews, United Kingdom
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    Sami Mikhail
    Sami Mikhail
    University of St Andrews, United Kingdom

    Dr. Mikhail is an Associate Professor at the University of St Andrews. His research is underpinned by a strong desire to understand the origin and evolution of atmospheres, which means I need to understand the nature of the volatile elements (primarily C-N-Noble gases) in the interior of planets to ascertain how they behave during accretion, differentiation, and during plate-tectonic cycling. He is a member of DCO’s Reservoirs and Fluxes Community.

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