modeling

Fate of Subducting Carbon

Studies of Exhumed Seafloor Show Fate of Subducting Carbon

Two new studies show that carbonate minerals in subducting ocean plates can dissolve and be funneled toward the surface once they encounter the heat and pressure of the mantle, creating carbon-rich minerals along the paths of these fluids. Some of the carbon, however, remains trapped in the sinking plate, where it likely stays in the mantle.

Showing 11-20 of 69 results
Webinar: Expanding our vision of space and time: EarthByte 8 March 2019 Feature

In this webinar, EarthByte developer Sabin Zahirovic (University of Sydney, Australia), along…

In Earth’s Magma Ocean, Carbon Chemistry Got Complicated
In Earth’s Magma Ocean, Carbon Chemistry Got Complicated 15 February 2019 Feature

In the first 100 million years after the formation of the solar system, another planetary body…

Cartoon of rocky growth of planets
Collision with a Mars-Sized Body Delivered Carbon to Early Earth 28 January 2019 Feature

About 4.6 billion years ago, meteorites and other ancient building blocks began to coalesce to form…

A Step Toward Modeling Carbonatites in the Subsurface 25 January 2019 Feature

When generations of phytoplankton with calcium carbonate shells die, their shells accumulate on the…

white cliffs of dover
Mapping the Growth of Seafloor Carbonates in Deep Time 19 December 2018 Feature

The dominant, and yet least explored, way that carbon returns to Earth’s interior is through the…

When Water Meets Rock
The First Steps When Water Meets Rock 12 December 2018 Feature

When water encounters certain magnesium- and iron-rich mantle minerals, exciting things can happen…

degassing at faults
Spreading Faults Create New Deep Carbon Leaks 26 November 2018 Feature

Since at least the 1970s, scientists have noticed that areas with frequent earthquakes also tend to…

Two New Sloan Foundation Grants for Deep Carbon Science 20 November 2018 Feature

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation recently announced two new Officer’s Grants for deep carbon science…

How Microbes Survive When Buried Alive 25 September 2018 Feature

For most microbes that settle into marine sediments, there’s nowhere to go but down. They become…

carbonate platforms and subduction zones
Global Temperatures Rise When Ancient Reefs Encounter Subduction Zones 19 July 2018 Feature

Carbonate platforms are ancient reefs that build up over millions of years, composed of the carbon-…

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