SG2019

biology meets subduction team

Could Microbes be the Gatekeepers of Earth’s Deep Carbon?

A new study from DCO’s Biology Meets Subduction team shows that microbes and calcite precipitation combine to trap about 94 percent of the carbon squeezed out from the edge of the oceanic plate as it sinks into the mantle during subduction. This carbon remains naturally sequestered in the crust, where it cannot escape back to the surface through nearby volcanoes.

Showing 11-18 of 18 results
DCO film wins top prize at Goldschmidt Film Festival 22 August 2017 Feature

Biology Meets Subduction follows a group of DCO scientists on a unique 12-day sampling expedition…

2019 Named “Year of Carbon” by Geological Society of London 14 July 2017 Feature

A continuation of “themed years” launched in 2015, The “Year of Carbon” will fulfill GSL’s science…

Help Choose the Five Most Important Carbon-Related Reactions, Earn a Chance to Participate in a DCO Workshop 25 May 2017 Feature

Well, now you have a chance to render an opinion and enter into the debate by clicking here, and…

DCO Webinar Wednesdays
DCO Webinar Wednesdays: Explore Data Science, Modeling, and Visualization 18 May 2017 Feature

A new series of DCO webinars focusing on big data modeling and visualization launched Wednesday, 17…

DCO Webinar Wednesdays
DCO Webinar Wednesdays Launching 17 May 2017 25 April 2017 Feature

A new series of DCO webinars focusing on big data modeling and visualization launched Wednesday, 17…

Paris Meeting Addresses Past, Present, Future DCO 21 November 2016 Feature

A joint meeting of DCO’s Executive Committee, Synthesis Group 2019 (SG2019), and Task Force 2020 (…

DCO Announces New Initiatives to Sustain Long-Term Research on Deep Carbon and Synthesize a Decade of Discovery 31 May 2016 Feature

The Deep Carbon Observatory program is truly exceptional in its goals and scope. Carbon is stored…

DCO Engagement and Synthesis: New Proposals Funded 29 March 2016 Feature

The proposals together lay out complementary aspects of DCO’s Engagement and Synthesis initiatives…

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